Snow on the Way – Sunday into Monday

February 9, 2013

Weather Forecasts


Snow-MapI’ve been talking about the risk of snow on Sunday for a while now and we’re finally able to firm up on some of the details. During the day on Sunday an area of low pressure with cold air wrapped around it will slide South-Eastwards across the country.

Initially we’re likely to see mostly rain or sleet down to lower levels, particularly across more Southern areas but as we move into Sunday evening and overnight into Monday we’ll see things turning increasingly to snow as the colder air digs back down.

Accumulations quite widely are expected to range between 4-6cm although lower ground may not quite see these totals due to the rain before hand limiting settling potential. Higher ground could see up to 10-12cm in local spots.

During Monday morning an area of snow is expected to effect South-East England giving accumulations of 2-5cm quite widely, particularly to higher levels.

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4 Comments on “Snow on the Way – Sunday into Monday”

  1. michael haydon Says:

    If UK forecasters were let lose on CNN to forecast, That a big snow event was due in American states including Coastal regions, they would get it wrong, because here, UK forecasters were putting large swathes of snow symbols Friday, from isle of man, through all Nwest England and parts of Cumbria, and Midlands.

    What do we have instead, calm, no wind, and just pouring old rain. Instead of supposed ESE strong winds, with 10cm snow on low levels. What a joke we must be in the meterology community.

    Reply

    • Daniel Smith Says:

      The problem is, forecasting snow in America is a completely different thing to forecasting it here in the UK. America is a large landmass which means colder air can easily filter down. The recent pattern was quite simple, low pressure moving into colder air turning to snow.

      Here in the UK we’re surrounded by water on the edge of a large landmass but also on the edge of a very warm ocean in which we have the Jet Stream and the Gulf Stream pushing towards us bringing milder air. The current setup we’re seeing is highly complex. Cold air wrapped around an area of low pressure with a warm sector. Pin pointing where the snow will fall in setups like this is next to impossible, especially when all models are showing something slightly different. The American models were all in agreement over what would happen for them.

      Forecasters are only as good as the models, if all models agree then forecasting whats going to happen is simple, but like today when all models show a different solution, it’s incredibly difficult.

      Reply

      • Joe Says:

        I would just like to add, this winter the cold air from the north has not been quite as cold as it should be for this time of year. The only time we had a really cold airmass was December. January cold spell was snowy but the air mass was not as cold as it should be, especially this time around in February, where it made this snow event very marginal. If the air mass was colder then there would have been more snow. I live in the north west of England on the coast, snow was promised a couple of times, and the track of snow changed at the last minute. That’s weather and weather can be dissapointing.

        Reply

      • Sib Says:

        Totally agree with Daniel too. The weather system in UK is very chaotic because if te jet stream and the fact we are surrounded by water. As we know it the warm air from the atlantic always brings rain. And the cold air only manages to enter briefly from the continent. Only time we get significant snow is when the system locks for a period of time over the UK. Apart from that its usually a win win for the atlantic.

        Reply

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